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Research

Allergy Research Group

Group Leader

Prof Dianne Campbell
Professor and Head, Discipline of Paediatrics, University of Sydney
Chair of Paediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Allergy and Immunology, CHW
Phone: 61-2-9845-3418
Fax: 61-2-9845-3421
Email: dianne.campbell1@health.nsw.gov.au

ADDVIT: Vitamin D in the management of Childhood Atopic Dermatitis - NOW RECRUITING!

This study will assess the effect of Vitamin D supplementation on disease severity and use of topical steroids in children with moderate and moderate-severe atopic dermatitis.

Does your 2-15 year old child have eczema that you struggle to control with moiturisers and topical steroids?

We are investigating whether vitamin D supplementation decreases eczema severity and use of topical steroids

Study participants will be offered measurement of their vitamin D level and replacement if their level is low.

If you would like to participate please contact us for further information:

T: (02) 9845 3420 | E: ADDVITchw.schn@health.nsw.gov.au

This study has been approved by The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Ethics Committee with approval number 12/SCHN/24.

Further information can be obtained by contacting the department by telephone or email. The information sheet for the study can be viewed by clicking here Adobe PDF Document

BEAT: Beating Egg Allergy Trial - NOW RECRUITING!

This study will assess the effect of early introduction of egg into the diets of infants at high risk for atopy and subsequent egg allergy.

Are you pregnant or have just given birth to a child?

Do you or anyone in your family have allergies?

We are investigating whether the early introduction of egg into a baby's diet affects the later development of allergies.

Study participants will be offered a full allergy assessment

If your baby has a sibling or parent with an allergy (e.g. eczema, asthma, food allergy or hayfever), then please contact us for further information:

T: (02) 9845 1055 | E: beat@chw.edu.au

This study has been approved by The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Ethics Committee with approval number 10/CHW/4.

Further information can be obtained by contacting the department by telephone or email. The information sheet for the study can be viewed by clicking here.

Current research program

Allergic disorders, such as food allergies, asthma and atopic dermatitis, have increased dramatically over the past 20 years with over 30% of Australian children having some form of atopic disease. The Department's research focus is on understanding how to prevent allergic diseases from developing, and managing them more effectively both at the individual and population based level. Current research projects include:

  • Does early introduction of foods affect the later development of food allergies in atopic children?
  • Predicting which children with egg allergy are able to tolerate baked foods such as cakes containing small quantities of egg.
  • Characteristics of seafood allergy in Australian children.
  • Management of children with severe eczema.
  • Characteristics of children with Food Protein Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome.
  • Diagnosis and Management of children with Eosinophilic Oesophagitis

Research achievements

The Department has published widely on food allergy and tolerance mechanisms over the past year. It has conducted and published evidence of increasing food allergy presentations to the emergency department and increasing rates of food anaphylaxis. Another study supports the role for small amounts of egg incorporation in the diet of egg allergic children and subsequent outgrowing egg allergy.

The study of Food protein Induced Enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) - a rare non IgE food allergy disorder - has continued. Dr Alyson Kakakios continues her involvement in the Early Prevention of Asthma in Atopic Children (EPAAC Study Group), which has published this year on worldwide variation in IgE sensitization in children.

The Childhood Asthma Prevention study (CAPS) cohort continues to be examined. Parental compliance with allergy primary prevention interventions has been studied and results published in 2008.disorders, such as food allergies, asthma and atopic dermatitis, have increased dramatically over the past 20 years with over 30% of Australian children having some form of atopic disease. The Department's research focus is on understanding how to prevent allergic diseases from developing, and managing them more effectively both at the individual and population based level.

Key publications

  • Allergic rhinitis in children. Turner PJ, Kemp AS. J Paediatr Child Health. 2010 Jun 27. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Rice: a common and severe cause of food protein induced enterocolitis syndrome. Mehr S, Kakakios A, Kemp A. Arch Dis Child. 2009;94(3):220-223.
  • Food protein induced enterocolitis: a 16 year review. Mehr S, Kakakios A, Frith K, Kemp A. Pediatrics. 2009, 123(3);e459-464.
  • Sublingual immunotherapy for children: Are we there yet? Defining its role in clinical practice. Campbell DE. Paediatr Respir Rev. 2009 Jun;10(2):69-74.
  • Dietary advice, dietary adherence and the acquisition of tolerance in egg-allergic children: a 5-yr follow-up. Allen CW, Kemp AS, Campbell DE. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2009 May;20(3):213-8.
  • Parental perceptions in egg allergy: Does egg challenge make a difference? Kemp AS, Allen CW, Campbell DE. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2009 Feb 11.
  • Food allergy: is strict avoidance the only answer? Allen CW, Campbell DE, Kemp AS. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2009 Aug;20(5):415-22.
  • Feeding choice for children with immediate allergic reactions to cow's milk protein. Mehr S, Kemp AS. Med J Aust. 2008 Aug 4;189(3):178-9.
  • Food allergy and anaphylaxis - dealing with uncertainty. Kemp AS, Hu W. Med J Aust. 2008 May 5;188(9):503-4 BMJ. 2009 Jan 9;338:b26.
  • Adherence to allergy prevention recommendations in children with a family history of asthma. Mihrshahi S, Webb K, Almqvist C, Kemp AS; CAPS Team. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2008 Jun;19(4):355-62.

Research Team

  • Prof Dianne Campbell, Lead, Allergy Research Group
  • A/Prof Alyson Kakakios, Department Head and Senior Staff Specialist
  • Dr Melanie Wong, Senior Staff Specialist
  • Dr Sam Mehr, Staff Specialist
  • Dr Preeti Joshi, Staff Specialist
  • Dr Paul Turner, Clinical Fellow (currently at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London)
  • Dr John Tan, Clinical Fellow
  • Ms Mary-Ellen Byrne, Clinical Nurse Consultant
  • Ms Barbara Dennison, Senior Allergy Dietitian
  • Ms Savita Joshi, Clinical Support Officer
  • Dr Peter Hsu, Advanced Registrar
  • Dr Lara Ford, Clinical Fellow

Allergy Resources

The Allergy & Immunology department have developed a series of fact sheets which will be of interest to health professionals and interested members of the public.

Opportunities for Students

Postgraduate Research available at the University of Sydney.


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