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Professionals

Pelvic Osteotomy

Disclaimer: This fact sheet is for education purposes only. Please consult with your doctor or other health professional to make sure this information is right for your child.

Definition

Osteotomy means cutting and realigning the bone. Therefore, a Pelvic osteotomy is the cutting part of the Pelvic bone. There are various reasons why the Pelvic bone is cut. Most commonly it is to help correct the way a hip joint has become deformed due to muscle imbalance. That is, part of the pelvic bone will be cut so that it can be redirected to form a deeper socket so that the head of the thigh bone can sit better in the joint. The main aim of this surgery is to reduce pain, correct or prevent further hip dislocations and correct abnormal hip development.

Pelvic Osteotomy

Weight Bearing:

2-4 weeks of non-weight bearing to allow the bone to heal.

Plasters:

Not Required

Orthoses:

Not Required

Special Instructions:

There may be a period of time after surgery in which pain may linger on. This is due to the fact that big changes have been made to the joint itself. It can often take a few months until the hip joint is used to its new position.

Equipment:

Your child will need a wheelchair and perhaps a hoist and a commode to help with toileting. Speak to an OT for further advice and recommendations regarding equipment.

The Children's Hospital at Westmead Rehabilitation and Orthopaedic Combined Service
The Children's Hospital at Westmead
Cnr Hawkesbury Rd & Hainsworth St, Westmead
Locked Bag 4001, Westmead, 2145
Tel: (02) 9845 0728 - Fax: (02) 9845 3685
http://www.chw.edu.au/prof/services/rehab/rehab_ortho/

© The Children's Hospital at Westmead - 1997-2010

This document was updated on Thursday, 11 February 2010.

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